The Glory of Lent

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One of our hymns for Lent begins, “The glory of these forty days we celebrate with songs of praise; for Christ, by whom all things were made, himself has fasted and has prayed.”  The text of the hymn comes from sixth century Latin, some think that Pope Gregory I (the Great) was involved in its composition.  The tune is from a sixteenth century German hymnbook that was edited by Martin Luther.  There is a lot of theological content here.  We see the connection between the forty days of Lent and the story of Jesus fasting for forty days in Matthew chapter 4.  We see Christ identified as the one “by whom all things were made,” which is a phrase from the Nicene Creed that highlights the central mystery of Christianity:  Jesus, the man who traveled around Palestine two thousand years ago, is also the God who made the universe.  We also see the interesting idea that fasting and prayer, though perhaps low on the excitement scale, should be praised because they draw us closer to God, which is the whole point of Christianity.  All that in the first verse!  Come and join us on Sunday to hear and ponder the other four verses.

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The Glory of Lent

One of our hymns for Lent begins, “The glory of these forty days we celebrate with songs of praise; For Christ, by whom all things were made, Himself has fasted and has prayed.”  The text of the hymn comes from sixth century Latin, some think that Pope Gregory I (the Great) was involved in its composition.  The tune is from a sixteenth century German hymnbook that was edited by Martin Luther.  There is a lot of theological content here.  We see the connection between the forty days of Lent and the story of Jesus fasting for forty days in Matthew chapter 4.  We see Christ identified as the one “by whom all things were made,” which is a phrase from the Nicene Creed that highlights the central mystery of Christianity:  Jesus, the man who traveled around Palestine two thousand years ago, is also the God who made the universe.  We also see the interesting idea that fasting and prayer, though perhaps low on the excitement scale, should be praised because they draw us closer to God, which is the whole point of Christianity.  All that in the first verse!  Come and join us on Sunday to hear and ponder the other four verses.

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The Great Litany

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During the Sundays in Lent we say as a community the Litany. It is a corporate prayer for ourselves, friends, colleagues, and family. In the Litany we pray for our neighborhoods, communities, and the nation. Our petitions covers the whole world and all of creation in this sweeping liturgy of praise. Select this link to make the prayers:

http://justus.anglican.org/resources/bcp/1928/Litany.htm

Better yet, join us on Sunday at 10:30am to add to our corporate prayers on behalf of the whole world.

 

 

 

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Soup of the Evening

     St. Barnabas invites you to join us for soup suppers on Wednesday evenings during Lent (March 8 through April 5).  Supper will be available beginning at 6:00 pm, but it’s OK to come later if traffic is slow.  Sharing a simple meal will help us know one other better.  More importantly, we will grow in the knowledge of Jesus Christ. If you are looking for a church steeped in the Anglican tradition, we are happy to share in the centuries old heritage of “English Spirituality”.  After supper, we will gather around informal prayer for the sake of ourselves, our families and friends, and the sake of the world. We lift these prayers to a loving Lord and mediator who gave his life willingly for us.
     If you are interested learning more about the Christian faith, Lent is a wonderful time to explore. This is a time when we walk on a journey that recalls Jesus Christ’s same path to the cross, the passion and the resurrection miracle of Easter. If you are looking for hidden esoteric mysteries and arcane practices, you will be disappointed. If you are humbly seeking God and desire to grow in the mystical experience of a living Lord, you will not be disappointed.
     There are no secret antechambers or hidden passage ways in our simple space. Our entire footprint is laid out to encourage worship, prayer and genuine fellowship. Jesus Christ is our guide along with the faithful who have gone before us.  Even though we live in the age that promises interstellar travel and ever more complicated interplay of converging technologies, Lent is a time to slow our pace and focus our meditations.  Lent is also a time for reflection and penitence. Lent is particularly a time for Christians to come together in fellowship and good cheer. Join us at this time and you will be blessed.
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The Season of Lent

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Lent, as its older name (Lengten) implies, is the season of spring, when the days begin to lengthen (at least in the northern hemisphere).  In the Church, Lent is a season of forty days leading up to Easter.  It is reminiscent of the 40 days Christ spent in the wilderness prior to the start of His public ministry. At this time, we examine ourselves, repent of our sins, and prepare for the Good News that, in his life, death, and resurrection, Jesus has made it possible for us to live with God forever.  Lent begins with Ash Wednesday (this coming Wednesday), so called because part of the liturgy includes marking the participants with ashes on their foreheads, asking us to recall that we are “ashes to ashes, dust to dust.”  We have no right to God’s regard except through the sacrifice of Jesus.  This is very counter-cultural but profoundly true.  Most of us think of ourselves, most of the time, as pretty good people.  And in a sense we are.  But all of us have made mistakes, been thoughtless or heartless to others, neglected the poor around us, neglected God.
God’s standard is not “pretty good,” but “perfectly holy.”  He is not aloof in his goodness, he actively wants us to share it.  He has not neglected our poverty, he has shared it, even sharing in degradation and death.  What wondrous love is this!  In order to understand this amazing love and care, come and join us on Ash Wednesday (at Noon or 7:00 p.m.). Throughout the weeks of Lent, we gather in special focus to prepare for the great culmination of this season. On Sunday’s we will have adult bible studies at 9:10am, before the 10:30am service. On Wednesday’s we meet for a simple meal, reflection and prayer at 6:30pm each week. From Palm Sunday – April 9 through April 16th we are immersed in the Holiest of weeks with special services and liturgies until Easter Day.
On the last day before the sober season of Lent, it has become popular to celebrate a party called Fat Tuesday (Mardi Gras), for example in New Orleans.  We won’t exactly participate in wild revelry, but we will celebrate the Anglican version, known as Shrove (for striving) Tuesday, by serving pancakes starting at 6:30 p.m.  All are welcome.

 

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Blessings for a Holy Lent – Fr. Harley+ & the parish of St. Barnabas

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Old or new?

Old or New? Over the last few years churches have tried to distinguish themselves from their sister churches by reaching to the early church past to define the cutting edge church future. The term to describe this enviable state of embracing a distant golden age of faith and presenting in appealing new ways has been described as “Ancient/Future”.  This is not to be confused with the world music band “Ancient Future” which was formed in 1978. When describing this term to a family friend they quickly replied, “you mean yesterday?”.

Yes, we use an ancient form of liturgy and we follow the rhythm of the church year, which is centuries old.  Yet here we are, communicating by blog.  We are a member of the Anglican Church in North America, which was formed (out of pre-existing groups of Anglicans) in 2009.  So are we old or new?  We are both.  Like the Anglican Church in the 16th century, we honor the pioneers of the Church, the Apostles who knew Jesus.  The Reformers were inspired by the early “Fathers and Mothers” of the church who struggled to define Christianity in the first 3 or 4 centuries of the young church.
We believe that Jesus is the same now and forever and that in every age he holds out to us the hope of overcoming sin, evil, and death.  And we are open to your questions and concerns today.  You are welcome to join us in worship of God that is old but always new. On Wednesday at Noon and 7:00pm (March 1) we offer the ancient liturgy of imposition of ashes to begin the season of Lent. During this season the faithful recall the 40 days that Christ was to fast in the wilderness. We too make our wilderness pilgrimage on our way to the Cross of Christ at Easter.
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Classes on Basic Christian Doctrine

You are welcome to join us for a series of classes on basic Christian doctrine, using the Thirty-Nine Articles of the Anglican Church as a basis.  The next topic, this Sunday (Feb. 19th) will be the Biblethe place it holds in Christian theology and how the Church understands it.  Later topics will include the Being of God, the Nature of Man, the Church, the Sacraments, and issues that have historically divided the Anglican Church from the Roman Catholic Church.  Your questions are welcome!  Each class will be self-contained, so come when you can.  Classes will be on the following dates at 9:10 (between the 8:00 and 10:30 liturgies):  Feb. 19th, March 5th, March 12th, March 19th, April 2nd, & April 9th.

Note: We will not meet on Feb. 26th or March 26th.

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Held to an account

February 15, 2017 – Wednesday Morning
Who can say, I have made my heart clean?1
The Lord looked down from heaven upon the children of men, to see if there were any that did understand, and seek God. They are all gone aside, they are all together become filthy: there is none that doeth good, no, not one.2  They that are in the flesh cannot please God.3
To will is present with me; but how to perform that which is good I find not. For the good that I would I do not: but the evil which I would not, that I do.4  We are all as an unclean thing, and all our righteousnesses are as filthy rags: and we all do fade as a leaf: and our iniquities, like the wind, have taken us away.5
The scripture hath concluded all under sin, that the promise by faith of Jesus Christ might be given to them that believe.6  God was in Christ, reconciling the world unto himself, not imputing their trespasses unto them.7
If we say that we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us. If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness.8
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1Pro 20:9; 2Psa 14:2,3; 3Rom 8:8; 4Rom 7:18,19; 5Isa 64:6; 6Gal 3:22; 72Co 5:19; 81Jo 1:8,9;
From Bagster’s Daily Light (KJV)
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“Office in a small city” Edward Hopper
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The Bright Morning Star

I am … the bright and morning Star.1

There shall come a star out of Jacob.2

The night is far spent, the day is at hand: let us therefore cast off the works of darkness, and let us put on the armour of light.3  Until the day break, and the shadows flee away, turn, my beloved, and be thou like a roe or a young hart upon the mountains of Bethel.4

Watchman, what of the night? The watchman said, The morning cometh, and also the night: if ye will enquire, enquire ye: return, come.5

I am the light of the world.6  I will give him the morning star.7

Take ye heed, watch and pray: for ye know not when the time is. For the Son of man is as a man taking a far journey, who left his house, and gave authority to his servants, and to every man his work, and commanded the porter to watch. Watch ye therefore: … lest coming suddenly he find you sleeping. And what I say unto you I say unto all, Watch.8
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1Rev 22:16; 2Num 24:17; 3Rom 13:12; 4Sol 2:17; 5Isa 21:11,12; 6Joh 8:12; 7Rev 2:28; 8Mar 13:33-37;

From: Bagster’s Daily Light

 

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The Least Of These… who are they?

An important message from The Rt. Rev. Julian Dobbs.

julian dobbs

For everything there is a season, and a time for every matter under heaven.  [Ecclesiastes 3:1]

In 2015, I was working with Congressional Leaders endeavoring to help Assyrian Christians escape the constant danger of Islamic terror. I was thankful for a small but growing number of Democrat and Republican House and Senate leaders who were supportive.

The words of Archbishop Bashar Warda of Erbil, Northern Iraq, showed the desperation faced by the Assyrian Christians: Throughout all these long centuries, we have experienced many hardships and persecutions, offering caravans of martyrs. Yet 2014 brought the worst acts of genocide against us in our history. We now face the extinction of Christianity as a religion and as a culture from Mesopotamia [ancient Iraq].

Despite ISIS’ targeting Iraqi Christians, the U.S. State Department’s Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration (PRM) told me on January 15, 2015 there was no way that Christians would…

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